Food transparency

How important is food traceability to you ?  Should we have a transparent food chain particularly when it comes to GMO foods ?  Here at Peelham we think food integrity and traceability are as crucial to customers as nutrition and taste.  Denise argues this case in her response to The Scottish Farmers Opinion Piece last week published in The Scottish Farmer today:

Sir – In  your  regular feature ‘From the Men who Know’, Jim Brown (TSF 22nd August), states that ‘…it is total rubbish’ that consumers do not want GM food with the justification that ‘They are already eating it and they simply do not know’ immediately begging-the-question ‘Would they eat it if they knew’ ?  Regardless of opinions or concerns (which are increasing), about the safety of GM presence in food, the attitude to the consumer and the market place expressed in this article is astonishing in its arrogance and worrying in its ignorance.

Recent FSA research (2015), indicates that consumers want labels to state the presence of GM food including meat from livestock fed with GM food so that they can make an informed choice.  Recent market research in America (The Hartman Group 2014), demonstrates that the American consumer increasingly wants food transparency relating to GM food products.  This report significantly warns that companies which stay silent on the issue face the greatest risk of losing consumer trust and relevance.  This  warning is equally significant to food companies in Scotland and the rest of the UK.

The ‘Man who Knows’ should know that the market place determines our incomes and security as farmers. We can no longer blithely grow food which ever way we want and expect society or ‘the market place’ to simply take it.  Consumers make our market and they are growing increasingly sensitive to, and aware of the acute relationship between food, health and environment. They (we) have a right to know.  No amount of eminent scientists writing letters of complaint to the Government or ‘girning’ farmers will make-up for the lack of transparency in the food chain and the increasing concerns for human and environmental health.

On a positive note and one from which as an industry we could benefit, particularly from land re-knowned for its naturalness, beauty and cleanliness, the ‘free-from’ or ‘purity attributes’ in food are becoming mainstream in both UK and American food cultures.  The Scottish Government is absolutely ‘on-message’ to take the stand on banning the growth of GMOs and to protect Scotland’s reputation for green and safe food  production.  There is of course a great deal more that can be done to develop this Unique Selling Point and it isn’t just about GMOs !

Yours 

Denise Walton 

Organic meat is more nutritious

Ground-breaking new study reveals that organic meat and dairy are more nutritious than non-organic

What we have all known intuitively has been demonstrated by the largest sysematic review of peer-reviewed research of its kind. Published today 16 February 2016, in the British Journal of Nutrition shows organic milk and dairy products and meat contain around 50% more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than non-organic.

Key findings:

both organic milk (dairy) and meat contain around 50% more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally produced products
organic meat had slightly lower concentrations of two saturated fats linked to heart diseaseorganic milk and dairy contains 40% more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) – CLA has been linked to a range of health benefits including reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, certain cancers and obesity, but evidence is mainly from animal studies
organic milk and dairy contains slightly higher concentrations of iron, Vitamin E and some carotenoids
organic milk contains less iodine than non-organic milk
This is fantastic news for organic producers (like us here at Peelham), and their customers. We can now discuss and argue and persuade with confidence that organic farming IS better for our environment, our animals and for us ! AND that we as farmers feed our farm animals has a direct effect on what we eat !

Read the Soil Associaton press release here

And treat your self to DELICIOUS grass-reared Peelham Rump Steak (or two !) here

Helen Helps Launch Connect Local

Peelham with other selected local producers, recently helped launch Connect Local, Scotland’s local food and drink marketing advisory service at Contini’s Cannoball Restaurant on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile (a terrific venue with the best view of Edinburgh Castle). Our Helen (Peelham’s Sales Manager, latest member of the team and Chris and Denise’s daugher-in-law !), with a selection of our products including organic lamb leg and charcuterie, attended the launch by Fergus Ewing MSP, Cabinet Secretary of Rural Affairs and the Environment.

Connect Local is a free service offering advice on food business development and is a testament to the Scottish Government’s commitment to the contribution of Scotlands artisan food entrepreneurs to the burgeoning Scottish food industry. www.connectlocal.scot

Helen with Fergus Ewing MSP Cabinet Secretary of Rural Affairs and the Environment.

Cooking Gammons

First of all if you havent already buy your Gammon here.  Gammon can be SLOWLY simmered or SLOWLY roasted. Roasting can make the gammon a bit dry.  Here at Peelham, we prefer to gently simmer because we LOVE the stock for Boxing Day soup.

No need to soak our mildly cured gammons before Simmering GENTLY for 1hr/kg.  Keep it SIMPLE; Immerse in cold water, bring to a simmering boil.  Add cloves, pepper corns, garlic, celery leaves and bay leaves to flavour and make that wonderful stock.  Cool in the pan once cooked.  Peel off the outer skin, leaving string. Push whole cloves into that BEAUTIFUL,creamy, Tamworth fat  and add your favourite glaze before placing in the oven at 190deg for ½ hr. Watch the glaze does not burn.

Your SLOW matured, dry-cured gammon is from our SLOW growing, free-ranging organic Tamworth and Tamworth cross pigs.  We dry-cure our gammons by-hand. No salt injections, No brining, No cure-accelerators, colorants or colour-fixers. The result is a soft natural pink when cooked, which fades naturally when exposed to air or light.

Glazing Your Peelham Cooked Ham

Your SLOW matured, dry-cured cooked ham is from our SLOW growing, free-ranging organic Tamworth and Tamworth cross pigs.  We dry-cure our gammons by-hand. No salt injections, No brining, No cure-accelerators, colorants or colour-fixers. The result is a soft natural pink when cooked, which fades naturally when exposed to air or light.

To glaze your cooked ham, push whole cloves into that BEAUTIFUL, creamy, Tamworth fat every inch (or so), and add your favourite glaze before placing in the oven at 190deg for 40 minutes. Watch the glaze does not burn.

Four Simple and delicious ideas for a glazes:  1).  Just honey !  2) Honey with a dessert spoon of dry mustard 3). Good quality chunky marmalade with a teaspoon of dried mustard   4).  Use your excess mince meat !

HAVE A VERY HAPPY AND HEALTHY CHRISTMAS AND THANKYOU FOR GETTING YOUR COOKED HAM FROM PEELHAM !

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